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HISTORIC SITES

Minard Castle

Minard Castle is situated on a piece of land stretching out into the sea in the parish of Minard, near Lispole. A considerable portion of the castle remains. Walter Hussey, a Norman who settled in Dingle, had a garrison there in 1641. Colonels Lehunt and Sadler beseiged the castle. The castle defenders, being short of ammunition, were forced to use pewter bullets. As soon as the besiegers noticed this, they approached the castle by stealth, placed a charge under it, and blew up a great section. It is interesting to note that the beach near the castle is a natural storm beach, the boulders being thrown up by the sea during storms.

 

Caherconree

Caherconree (the Kings Table) is named after a stone fort situated two-thirds of the way up. In legend this is the fort of Cú Roí mac Daire, hero of Munster, who was able to make it spin around at night to perplex any attackers looking for the entrance. 
The best known story connected with it relates how Cú Chulainn attacked the fort with the aid of Blathnaid, the daughter of the king of Man, whom Cú Roí had taken, none too willingly, for his wife. Blathnaid taunted Cú Roí that his fort was too small for such a magnificent chieftain as himself, and when the walls were down during the construction of bigger fort, she poured milk in a stream (now the Finglas River, from Ir. An Fhionnghlaise, 'the white stream') as a signal to Cú Chulainn that the moment was right to attack.

The summit is known as Fin Mac Cool's Table, while a rock feature on the northern ridge connecting to Gearhane is called Fin Mac Cool's Chair. Caherconree is the second highest mountain in the Slieve Mish area and the 26th highest in Ireland.

 

Famous Shipwrecks

Florence Graham: a 379 ton Liverpool Barque carrying Palm Oil which was bound for Africa from Liverpool.
1865 the Giardiniera, a 400 ton Italian Barque carrying marble boulders and bones was wrecked.